Science Spotlight: IPA used to identify key network around COX-2 (PTGS2) in IVF research

Fertility research that used IPA to identify a key network involved in endometrial receptivity and clinical pregnancy was recently featured in a Molecular Medicine poster and article published in Fertility and Sterility,  and is featured in this month’s Science Spotlight.

We were at Molecular Medicine in San Francisco last month, having a great conversation with Inge Van Vaerenbergh and Dr. Clair Bourgain, from the Department of Pathology at the VUB in Belgium, when they mentioned that their Molecular Medicine poster was on a recent publication that had used IPA: “Cyclooxygenase-2 network as predictive molecular marker for clinical pregnancy in in vitro fertilization.”We went over, had a look and found a great example of how IPA was used in IVF research.  They told us,

“The receptivity of the endometrium for an intruding blastocyst is an important factor in the implantation of a human embryo in the uterus. The goal of our study was to establish molecular markers for endometrial receptivity and clinical pregnancy in stimulated cycles during in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment.

IPA showed us that the differentially expressed genes between pregnant and non-pregnant patients from our microarray experiments were connected into one single network with cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 or PTGS2) in a central role. Ingenuity saved us time and effort and provided us with information that we could not have found with a classic literature search. Ingenuity’s software was definitely a step forward in our quest towards a genetic signature for endometrial receptivity in stimulated cycles for IVF.”

You can read more about the research and see the pathway diagram of the COX-2 network in this month’s Science Spotlight, on the Ingenuity website now.

Go to the Ingenuity website.

“The receptivity of the endometrium for an intruding blastocyst is an important factor in the implantation of a human embryo in the uterus. The goal of our study was to establish molecular markers for endometrial receptivity and clinical pregnancy in stimulated cycles during in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment.

 

Photo from: Molecular Medicine Tri Conference, San Francisco 2011

 

IPA showed us that the differentially expressed genes between pregnant and non-pregnant patients from our microarray experiments were connected into one single network with cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 or PTGS2) in a central role. Ingenuity saved us time and effort and provided us with information that we could not have found with a classic literature search. Ingenuity’s software was definitely a step forward in our quest towards a genetic signature for endometrial receptivity in stimulated cycles for IVF.”